RSS Feed for This PostCurrent Article

Word of the day

I ripped this off from Wikipedia because I was looking for a word to use in place of “bullshit” in a headline.

Bullshit is commonly used to describe statements made by people more concerned with the response of the audience than in truth and accuracy, such as goal-oriented statements made in the field of politics or advertising. On one prominent occasion, the word itself was part of a controversial advertisement. During the 1980 U.S. presidential campaign, the Citizens Party candidate Barry Commoner ran a radio advertisement that began with an actor exclaiming: “Bullshit! Carter, Reagan and Anderson, it’s all bullshit!” NBC refused to run the advertisement because of its use of the expletive, but Commoner’s campaign successfully appealed to the Federal Communications Commission to allow the advertisement to run unedited.[5]

Distinguished from lying

“Bullshit” does not necessarily have to be a complete fabrication; with only basic knowledge about a topic, bullshit is often used to make the audience believe that one knows far more about the topic by feigning total certainty or making probable predictions. It may also merely be “filler” or nonsense that, by virtue of its style or wording, gives the impression that it actually means something.

In his essay on the subject, William G. Perry called bull[shit] “relevancies, however relevant, without data” and gave a definition of the verb “to bull[shit]” as follows:

To discourse upon the contexts, frames of reference and points of observation which would determine the origin, nature, and meaning of data if one had any. To present evidence of an understanding of form in the hope that the reader may be deceived into supposing a familiarity with content.[6]

The bullshitter generally either knows the statements are likely false, exaggerated, and in other ways misleading or has no interest in their factual accuracy one way or the other. “Talking bullshit” is thus a lesser form of lying, and is likely to elicit a correspondingly weaker emotional response: whereas an obvious liar may be greeted with derision, outrage, or anger, an exponent of bullshit tends to be dismissed with an indifferent sneer.

Trackback URL

RSS Feed for This Post1 Comment(s)

  1. derek | Oct 26, 2010 | Reply

    This article pretty much sums up everything you say

Sorry, comments for this entry are closed at this time.